We studied here the independent associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We performed a collaborative meta-analysis of 13 studies totaling 21,688 patients selected for CKD of diverse etiology. After adjustment for potential confounders and albuminuria, we found that a 15 ml/min per 1.73 m² lower eGFR below a threshold of 45 ml/min per 1.73 m² was significantly associated with mortality and ESRD (pooled hazard ratios (HRs) of 1.47 and 6.24, respectively). There was significant heterogeneity between studies for both HR estimates. After adjustment for risk factors and eGFR, an eightfold higher albumin- or protein-to-creatinine ratio was significantly associated with mortality (pooled HR 1.40) without evidence of significant heterogeneity and with ESRD (pooled HR 3.04), with significant heterogeneity between HR estimates. Lower eGFR and more severe albuminuria independently predict mortality and ESRD among individuals selected for CKD, with the associations stronger for ESRD than for mortality. Thus, these relationships are consistent with CKD stage classifications based on eGFR and suggest that albuminuria provides additional prognostic information among individuals with CKD.

Original publication

DOI

10.1038/ki.2010.550

Type

Journal article

Journal

Kidney Int

Publication Date

06/2011

Volume

79

Pages

1331 - 1340

Keywords

Adult, Aged, Albuminuria, Biomarkers, Chi-Square Distribution, Cohort Studies, Creatine, Disease Progression, Female, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Humans, Kidney, Kidney Diseases, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Male, Middle Aged, Predictive Value of Tests, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Regression Analysis, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors