• Prenatal famine exposure, adulthood obesity patterns and risk of type 2 diabetes.

    20 March 2018

    Background: Prenatal exposure to famine and adulthood obesity have been independently related to the risk of type 2 diabetes; however, little is known about the joint effects of these risk factors at different stages of life on adulthood diabetes risk. Methods: The analysis included 88 830 participants of the China Kadoorie Biobank, who were born around the time of the Chinese Great Famine and without diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, or cancer at baseline. We defined famine exposure subgroups as nonexposed (born between 1 October 1962 and 30 September 964), fetal-exposed (born between 1 October 1959 and 30 September 1961) and early-childhood exposed (born between 1 October 1956 and 30 September 1958). General obesity was assessed by body mass index (BMI: overweight ≥ 24.0, obesity ≥ 28.0) and abdominal obesity assessed by waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, men/women: moderate ≥ 0.90/0.85, high ≥ 0.95/0.90). Results: During a median 7.3 years (642 552 person-years) of follow-up, we identified 1372 incident cases of type 2 diabetes. Compared with nonexposed and early-childhood exposed participants combined as a single comparison group, fetal-exposed participants showed an increased risk of diabetes in adulthood [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.25; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-1.45]. The association between general obesity and diabetes was consistent across subgroups according to famine exposure (P for interaction > 0.05). A stronger association between abdominal obesity and diabetes was observed in the fetal-exposed subgroup than in other subgroups (P for interaction = 0.025 in the whole population). This interaction was more obvious in women (P = 0.013) but not in men (P = 0.699). Compared with normal-BMI and -WHR participants, those with both general (BMI ≥ 24.0) and abdominal (WHR ≥ 0.90/0.85) obesity in adulthood had 5.32 (95% CI: 3.81-7.43)-, 3.13 (2.48-3.94)- and 4.43 (3.45-5.68)-fold higher risks if these were carried during, before and after times of famine, respectively. Conclusions: Coexistence of prenatal experience of undernutrition and abdominal obesity in adulthood was associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes.

  • [Gender differences in stressful life events and depression in Chinese adults aged 30-79 years].

    26 April 2018

    Objective: To investigate gender specific differences in the association between stressful life events (SLEs) and depression in Chinese adults aged 30-79 years. Methods: In the baseline survey during 2004-2008, the China Kadoorie Biobank (CKB) recruited 512 891 men and women aged 30-79 years from 10 areas of China. Detailed information on SLEs, including demographic and socio-economic status, smoking, alcohol drinking and history of chronic disease, as well as depression symptoms and major depressive episodes (MDEs) in preceding 12 months, was collected by using standardized questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression model was employed to estimate the relative risk ratio (RRR) and 95%CI of SLEs (3 categories, 10 items) on depression and the dose-response relationship between the number of SLEs experienced and depression. The interactions between gender and SLEs on depression were examined with likelihood ratio test. Results: Among the 512 891 participants, 35 085 (6.8%) reported family-related events, 5 972 (1.2%) reported finance-related events, and 4 453 (0.9%) reported other stressful life events. Females had a higher occurrence of family-related events, while males had a higher occurrence of finance-related and other events (all P-value <0.001). After adjusted for potential confounders, SLEs were significantly associated with MDEs (RRR=11.99, 95%CI: 10.49-13.71 for males; RRR=14.15, 95%CI: 12.97-15.43 for females), and with depressive symptoms (RRR=7.43, 95%CI: 6.94-7.95 for males; RRR=8.30, 95%CI: 7.91-8.72 for females). And the associations were stronger in females than in males (P for interaction=0.049). In the three categories of SLEs, family-related events showed stronger association in female (P for interaction <0.001), while no gender specific differences were observed for the other two categories (all P-value>0.05). Furthermore, the effect of the number of SLEs experienced increased in a dose-response manner on depressive symptoms and MDEs for both genders, but no gender specific differences were found. Conclusions: The gender modifies the association between stressful life events and depression in Chinese adults, and women experienced family-related events have a greater risk of depression. The more the stressful events experienced, the more likely to have depression.

  • Relationship of alcohol intake and sex steroid concentrations in blood in pre- and post-menopausal women: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    26 April 2018

    OBJECTIVE: Women with a moderate intake of alcohol have higher concentrations of sex steroids in serum, and higher risk of developing breast cancer, compared to non-drinkers. In the present study, we investigate the relationships between alcohol consumption and serum levels of sex steroids and sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in 790 pre- and 1,291 post-menopausal women, who were part of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: Serum levels of testosterone (T), androstenedione (Delta4), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), estrone (E1), estradiol (E2) and SHBG were measured by direct immunoassays. Free T (fT) and free E2 (fE2) were calculated according to mass action laws. Current alcohol intake exposure to alcohol was assessed from dietary questionnaires. RESULTS: Pre-menopausal women who consumed more than 25 g/day of alcohol had about 30% higher DHEAS, T and fT, 20% higher Delta4 and about 40% higher E1, concentrations compared to women who were non-consumers. E2, fE2 and SHBG concentrations showed no association with current alcohol intake. In post-menopausal women, DHEAS, fT, T, Delta4, and E1 concentrations were between 10% and 20% higher in women who consumed more than 25 g/day of alcohol compared to non-consumers. E2 or fE2 were not associated with alcohol intake at all. SHBG levels were about 15% lower in alcohol consumers compared to non-consumers. CONCLUSION: This study supports the hypothesis of an influence of alcohol intake on sex hormone concentrations in blood.

  • Diabetes and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    26 April 2018

    BACKGROUND: Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms arising from the lymphopoietic system including a wide range of subtypes of either B-cell or T-cell lymphomas. The few established risk factors for the development of these neoplasms include viral infections and immunological abnormalities, but their etiology remains largely unknown. Evidence suggests that certain medical conditions may be linked, through immunosuppression, to the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Multiple myeloma is a neoplasm of plasma cells that accounts for approximately 15% of lymphopoietic cancers. Increases in the incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in the past implicate environmental factors as potential causal agents. DESIGN AND METHODS: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 1,213 histologically confirmed incident cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma (594 men; 619 women) were identified during a follow-up of 8.5 years. Cox proportional hazard models were used to explore the association between self-reported diabetes, diagnosed after 30 years of age, and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall and multiple myeloma and various lymphoma subtypes. RESULTS: We found no association between a personal history of diabetes and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall in men (HR: 1.28, 95% CI: 0.89-1.84), in women (HR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.41- 1.24), or in men and women combined (HR: 1.09, 95% CI: 0.80-1.47). Among the B-non-Hodgkin's lymphoma subtypes, we observed a statistically significant increased risk of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (HR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.04-3.86) in men, but not in women (HR: 1.07, 95% CI: 0.33-3.43). CONCLUSIONS: This prospective study did not provide evidence for a role of self-reported diabetes in the etiology of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall or multiple myeloma. We found an increased risk of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia among men with diabetes, but not among women. We hypothesize that diabetes may not play a causal role in the etiology of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, though the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of both disorders may include shared genetic, host and/or environmental susceptibility factors.

  • Fruit and vegetable consumption and lymphoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    26 April 2018

    INTRODUCTION: Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant diseases of cells of the immune system. The best-established risk factors are related to dys-regulation of immune function, and evidence suggests that factors such as dietary or lifestyle habits may be involved in the etiology. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 849 lymphoma cases were identified in a median follow-up period of 6.4 years. Fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated from validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association between fruit and vegetable intake with the risk of lymphomas overall and subentities. RESULTS: There was no overall association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphoma [hazard ratio (HR)=0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-1.15 comparing highest with lowest quartile]. However, the risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) tended to be lower in participants with a high intake of total vegetables (HR=0.49, 95% CI 0.23-1.02). CONCLUSION: In this large prospective study, an inverse associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphomas overall could not be confirmed. Associations with lymphoma subentities such as DLBCL warrant further investigation.